Self-Care: Focusing on you

This fall semester has brought a full load of classes, projects, and committee work. Add on the election and the stress doubles. Since I began my job as an academic librarian, I have constantly heard “self care, self care.” However, being the stubborn person I am, I did not really understand the importance of setting time aside and knowing your limit of stress or frustration.

Usually, weekends are an escape, but when there is too much to do, it becomes a habit to take work home. Here are some tips of how I learned to make time for myself and my thoughts (both at work and at home)

-Get out of your cubicle/office. When I was drowning in work, it just seemed like I could not concentrate. I needed a change of scenery, just for a couple of hours. Get a space that’s just for yourself. Take your laptop, notebook, task list, and take that time to do what you need to get done.

-Coffee breaks are your best friend (in moderation). It gives you the opportunity to not only get caffeinated, but people watch while you’re in line.

-Walk around campus. Take a 10 minute walk to refresh your mind and get a little exercise

-It’s OK to take a day off when it comes to exercise. I usually go to the gym after work, but sometimes I’m so tired and cannot find the strength to change into gym clothes.

-Exercise! If you feel up for it, exercising can be a bit of time that is just for you and your thoughts. Download a podcast and hit the treadmill (or stair master, weights, pool)

-Chores around the house. I don’t know about you, but as I’ve gotten older, I have found cleaning quite therapeutic. It keeps me busy and I also like to talk to myself while I clean my room.

-Write! A lot of people find writing as a way to let out your thoughts, frustration, anger, etc. Take 10 or so minutes and just write about what you want. I will admit that a lot of times, my writings tend to be rants. I find that after a few minutes of furiously typing, I calm down.

Do not ignore your mental health! Your mental health is important above all else and when all is not well, it can start to impact your work and relationships. 

I know that for many people, myself included, it’s been a tough two weeks. Like many others, my mental health was affected by the results of the election, the rhetoric of the presidential campaigns, and the frustration with some acquaintances that did not understand why so many people were afraid. Take all of this and add in the workload and deadlines. Let’s remember that not everyone can take time off of work or call in sick, but some may have to find ways to work through this while at work. I hope that some of my suggestions can help. I don’t say this enough, but I am grateful for all the ACRLog readers, viewers, and writers! Take care of yourself and each other.

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