The Merging of ACRL and the Diversity Alliance

As many of you know, I am a resident librarian at American University in Washington, DC. In my first post for ACRLog, I posted that my residency is  part of a program called the Diversity Alliance. This program began with four schools. American University, West Virginia University, University of Iowa, and Virginia Tech University. These schools hired resident librarians and we began during the summer/fall of 2015. According to the ACRL Residency Interest Group, a residency position is “post-degree work experience designed as an entry level program for recent graduates of an MLS program.”

Almost two years later, the eight residents have formed a close cohort where we support, listen, and uplift each other.

So, what exactly is the Diversity Alliance? The Diversity Alliance began as a small collaboration of four schools, but over the past year and a half, has grown significantly. Since its founding, the Diversity Alliance saw the potential in not only their own residency programs, but in the potential as an organization and its opportunity for growth. The American Association of Research Libraries (ACRL) announced that they would unite “academic libraries who share a commitment to increase the hiring pipeline of qualified, talented individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. By thinking bigger and broader, across all academic libraries, we will introduce and welcome to the job market underrepresented racial and ethnic groups with work experiences that advance academic/research libraries.” 

“The commitment of each library leader to create one or more residency positions will increase the numbers of opportunities for professionally underrepresented racial and ethnic groups to gain the knowledge, skills and competencies to thrive in an academic context.”

It started with 4 schools and now 24 other universities (and still growing) have pledged to establish a residency program at their libraries.

As a resident, it’s been a great experience to be able to attend conferences and have people come up to me and ask me about my residency. I have spoken with many who want to bring a residency position to their university and who want to know more about my experience.  I have noticed that the conversation of residents and residency programs has increased and that more interest continues to rise. 

However, we have to remember that residency programs are not a new concept. The Mary P. Key Diversity Residency Program from Ohio State University was initiated in 1989 and its past residents include Courtney Young, former president of the American Libraries Association and Jon Cawthorne, the current Dean of Libraries at West Virginia University. As you can see, residencies have the potential to create top-notch librarians.

My hope is that years from now, we can look back at former residents of the Diversity Alliance and be proud of their accomplishments and show that residencies are beneficial in mentoring and allowing librarians the opportunity to explore the different facets of academic librarianship.

Over the past year and a half at American University, I have been able to kick-off my career as an academic librarian. I have had the support of my wonderful colleagues, my amazing mentor, and the support of American University. Through this residency, not only have I been able to get a great start on my career, but I was also able to participate and contribute to the university through committee work. During my time at American University, I have served on university-wide faculty committees, search committees for the library, and pursue my own interests outside of reference and instruction.

It has been a great experience and one I am lucky to have. That is why I am happy to share that American University will be hiring a second resident librarian! I am excited to have a second resident working alongside my colleagues and myself at American University.

Be sure to check out the job post and make sure to apply. If you have any questions, please email the address in the job listing or myself at Qlbarri@american.edu.

 

 

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