All posts by Quetzalli Barrientos

Going to ACRL Immersion 2017: Reflection and more reflection.

First, I do apologize for the late blog, but I wanted some days to collect my thoughts.

A couple of months ago, I found that I had been accepted to the Teacher Track for ACRL Immersion. This program was to take place in Burlington, Vermont. Last Sunday, I arrived and the program concluded last Friday. I have had some days to think about the last week, what I learned, what I need to do, and how I need to do it. There were so many things about Immersion that I could focus on, but instead, I will list what I learned (or didn’t).

  • The theme of the week was transformation and reflection. I had colleagues who had gone to Immersion many years ago and they told me that I needed to be prepared, because it would be a transformative experience. I agree, but my whole self (body and mind) was not completely transformed. Instead, I found myself thinking back and forth about an idea or concept and then being left with either a clear idea or continuing to be baffled. I would reflect about certain things during and outside of Immersion, which brings me to the next point.
  • I found that like Jon Snow, I know nothing.
  • Wait, maybe I do. A lot about what you thought about your teaching will be challenged. You will definitely doubt yourself, but that’s what the week is for. You’re there to doubt, reflect, hopefully transform your ideas, and reflect again (you’ll find that reflection is a huge thing at Immersion).
  • I learned that everyone has a different assessment technique and activity. I found myself pretty excited to take these ideas to American University Library. For those of you who know me, you know that I was not a huge fan of assessment…but I have clearly changed my ways.
  • The activities, exercises, and discussions that we did throughout the week, are meant to not only challenge the way you teach, but to look at things in a different light. For example, I know myself and a couple of other participants were definitely challenged when it came to active learning. Just because you have your students do some type of movement while in class, does not mean that it’s active learning. I know that might be a “duh” for some people, but definitely not for me. It is something I am still reflecting on.
  • I was comforted to know that some people at Immersion share the same insecurities I do. Whether it’s about teaching or being a librarian.
  • Through informal and casual conversations with other librarians at Immersion, I found us discussing some struggles we share or have. Whether it’s struggles with being a librarian, teaching, or other frustrations, it was clearly topics that we simply cannot share with our colleagues back at our own institutions.
  • No one leaves the program suddenly transformed into the “perfect teacher.” I do not believe that is the point of the program. What is the point, is gaining a new set of understanding, comprehension, reflection, and motivation of the topics taught at Immersion.

On a personal note, knowing I was coming to Immersion was exciting because I lived in Burlington when I was a child. It had been 20 years and Immersion gave me the opportunity to come back. I was in awe over how much the town had changed and kept asking myself, “how could my parents ever leave such a beautiful town.” They had their reasons, but it was a delight to have great Immersion faculty, great Immersion participants, and a great space to share ideas, thoughts, doubts, and breakthroughs.

I was also able to have breakfast with my first grade teacher and so that was the cherry on top of a great week. Until next time, Burlington.

 

 

 

 

 

Changing Roles: Mentee to Mentor

Like many of you, I just came back from ALA Annual in Chicago. I had the opportunity to attend some interesting sessions, meet new people, catch up with some old classmates, and see some librarians that I knew in library school.

In my previous ACRLog post, I talked a little about finding your own cohort. I found myself catching up with librarians that were supervisors at UIUC, as well as a classmate. We had a good mix of early career librarian and seasoned librarians. 

It seems like in any setting like that, we end up talking about our jobs, the profession, the job search, and telling each other of the future plans you’d like to accomplish. One of the things that I look forward to the most during conferences is catching up with people, hearing about their future plans, and also asking for advice on something I may have.

Mentorship is something I have touched on a lot during my time with ACRLog and it has gotten me thinking of the mentorship that I have received over the past 4 years. As a student, I received advice and help from not only the librarians supervising me, but the classmates who left and went off to great jobs. I would ask them for feedback on classes I would possibly take, professors I should avoid, and how to go about the job search. Two years later, I found myself being that person to a friend of mine who began library school last year. 

Now, I was the one getting asked for advice on classes, professors, the job hunt.  When did the mentee become the mentor? When I began American University, I was assigned to a mentor. By sheer luck, we were a perfect fit and I will probably continue to ask for her advice for the rest of my career.

I think that we never truly leave the roles of mentee and mentor, no matter our age or amount of time we have been in the profession. My thought or question to other librarians is, how do we manage both roles?

The Importance of Community

As everyone knows, library land is small. Having a profession where we all know each other or know of each other, can be a plus (but also has its drawbacks). This allows us to form our own smaller networks and build our own community. Being an early career librarian, I have quickly realized that while I have treated librarianship as a profession where one works alone, librarianship is in fact a team sport.

This past week, I had the opportunity to attend a conference-like event for my residency program. As most of you are familiar by now, I am part of the Diversity Alliance residency cohort. We have these conferences/gatherings about once a year. This year, we had a dual conference between Virginia Tech and American University.

The program included workshops, guest speakers, presentations and group dinners. Most importantly, all the residents were able to see each other again. While we occasionally see each other at conferences, these diversity alliance gatherings are an opportunity for the residents to catch up. We are able to talk about our jobs, our lives, any updates, and it’s a chance to catch up and learn about the exciting things that the residents are doing at their institutions.

I have been a librarian for only two years, but have realized the importance of having your own cohort. It does not necessarily mean that the people in this cohort are your best friends in the whole wide world. It might be a group of people who are not only your colleagues, but those who are able to be honest and frank with you. This is the group of people that you ask for advice, whether it’s library world or personal life. Above all, they are a support team. They support and mentor you–and you support and mentor them.

I would really encourage other librarians to think about the people they surround themselves with. I was basically put in a cohort as a diversity alliance resident, but after we all met, it just felt natural. We had shared experiences that brought us closer together and built a trust that you just can’t get out of thin air. I was lucky enough to be placed in a cohort, but I have also taken some time to slowly form other cohorts I want to be part of. I try not to force it, so I ask the readers, what is your advice to finding, forming, and nurturing groups like these?

The Season is Here: Conference Do’s and Don’ts

Conference season is upon us! With LOEX and ALA coming up, a lot of us are gearing up to travel and/or present at these conferences. Even with school coming to an end, conferences will certainly keep us librarians busy for the months to come.

The first library conference I attended was during my last semester as a library student. I attended Midwinter Chicago 2015 in order to go to the ALA Job Placement Center. The experience was one I remember very well. I was able to attend with some of my library school classmates and was able to have my resume looked at by another librarian. My main goal was preparing myself for the job search, but I do wish that I had networked more. Back then, I was a bit more shy and felt a little uneasy about interacting with people I did not know.

For a lot of you, this is not your first time attending a conference. For others, it is your first time. Everyone has different goals when it comes to attending conferences. It may be for networking, job hunting, committee work, or you might be presenting. While this post is mostly geared towards first-timers, it is my hope that everyone can get something out of this.

  • Let’s begin with the basics, what do I pack? Conferences are usually 3 or 4 days, at the most. You usually do not need much, but if you’re like me, you overpack. No, you do not need 3 pairs of sandals or 3 “going out” dresses. I am still working on my packing skills, but I find that I usually take one pair of jeans, 2 “work” dresses, 2 business casual tops, one pair of flats, and one cardigan.  As soon as I perfect my packing skills, I will let you know.
  • Check the conference website for transportation directions or accommodations. Make sure you make the proper arrangements and know how to arrive at your final location. Do not leave it at the last minute, because you’ll be left scrambling at the airport or bus station (like me).
  • Before arriving, research the location. If the conference is in a big city, is there a museum or place that you’d like to visit? My favorite conference places are college campuses. I like to look at a map of where I am staying and also the necessary commodities that may be in the area (like the libraries and the school spirit shop).
  • If you have a tablet, leave the laptop at home. I usually take one overnight bag with me and find that the laptop takes more space than it should.  I am in the process of purchasing an iPad and portable keyboard, so that should alleviate some of the bulkiness.
  • Carry a small tote bag with you. Mine has the following: pen, small notebook, hand sanitizer, cell phone, conference packet/schedule, cell phone charger, water bottle, tissues, and a lot of snacks.
  • Take your own coffee mug. Most conferences tend to have coffee breaks, but I like to use my own mug because one could always use more coffee.
  • If it’s your first time, ask yourself, what is your goal? Is it to go to specific presentations? Is it to network? Is it to research something? Organize your schedule. Before arriving to the conference, have a copy of the schedule and choose which sessions you would like to attend. I find that doing this helps me have a calm and productive conference experience
  • If you attend a conference with friends or colleagues, remember to not only talk to librarians you do not know, but sit with them. Have lunch with a new group and get to know them. Food and new friends, what’s better?
  • Don’t forget those business cards! Always keep a couple handy, not only while you’re at the conference, but during dinners or happy hours.
  • Presentation jitters? Take some time before your presentation and go to your hotel room and practice either by yourself or with a friend. Or just take a couple moments to relax and meditate. 
  • Go to a presentation/workshop that is out of your element. I think we tend to attend presentations that are relevant to our job duties or research, and that’s to be expected. However, I like to go to at least one presentation that has nothing to do with my every day duties or research interests, It’s always enlightening to learn something new.
  • Conferences can be draining, so if you feel tired, rest! As always, to prevent burnout, get some rest the night before or try to pace yourself throughout the conference.

What are your tips for conference success? Share below in the comment section.

 

The Merging of ACRL and the Diversity Alliance

As many of you know, I am a resident librarian at American University in Washington, DC. In my first post for ACRLog, I posted that my residency is  part of a program called the Diversity Alliance. This program began with four schools. American University, West Virginia University, University of Iowa, and Virginia Tech University. These schools hired resident librarians and we began during the summer/fall of 2015. According to the ACRL Residency Interest Group, a residency position is “post-degree work experience designed as an entry level program for recent graduates of an MLS program.”

Almost two years later, the eight residents have formed a close cohort where we support, listen, and uplift each other.

So, what exactly is the Diversity Alliance? The Diversity Alliance began as a small collaboration of four schools, but over the past year and a half, has grown significantly. Since its founding, the Diversity Alliance saw the potential in not only their own residency programs, but in the potential as an organization and its opportunity for growth. The American Association of Research Libraries (ACRL) announced that they would unite “academic libraries who share a commitment to increase the hiring pipeline of qualified, talented individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. By thinking bigger and broader, across all academic libraries, we will introduce and welcome to the job market underrepresented racial and ethnic groups with work experiences that advance academic/research libraries.” 

“The commitment of each library leader to create one or more residency positions will increase the numbers of opportunities for professionally underrepresented racial and ethnic groups to gain the knowledge, skills and competencies to thrive in an academic context.”

It started with 4 schools and now 24 other universities (and still growing) have pledged to establish a residency program at their libraries.

As a resident, it’s been a great experience to be able to attend conferences and have people come up to me and ask me about my residency. I have spoken with many who want to bring a residency position to their university and who want to know more about my experience.  I have noticed that the conversation of residents and residency programs has increased and that more interest continues to rise. 

However, we have to remember that residency programs are not a new concept. The Mary P. Key Diversity Residency Program from Ohio State University was initiated in 1989 and its past residents include Courtney Young, former president of the American Libraries Association and Jon Cawthorne, the current Dean of Libraries at West Virginia University. As you can see, residencies have the potential to create top-notch librarians.

My hope is that years from now, we can look back at former residents of the Diversity Alliance and be proud of their accomplishments and show that residencies are beneficial in mentoring and allowing librarians the opportunity to explore the different facets of academic librarianship.

Over the past year and a half at American University, I have been able to kick-off my career as an academic librarian. I have had the support of my wonderful colleagues, my amazing mentor, and the support of American University. Through this residency, not only have I been able to get a great start on my career, but I was also able to participate and contribute to the university through committee work. During my time at American University, I have served on university-wide faculty committees, search committees for the library, and pursue my own interests outside of reference and instruction.

It has been a great experience and one I am lucky to have. That is why I am happy to share that American University will be hiring a second resident librarian! I am excited to have a second resident working alongside my colleagues and myself at American University.

Be sure to check out the job post and make sure to apply. If you have any questions, please email the address in the job listing or myself at Qlbarri@american.edu.