Tag Archives: Disaster Relief

Love for Houston, Love for Texas

The August 29th issue of American Libraries (AL) Direct included a notice about the relief efforts in Houston, Rockport, and Corpus Christi in the wake of devastating flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey. Because it’s AL Direct, the announcement focused on libraries that sustained damage and ways in which the library community can help libraries. This is, of course, important, but more pressing at this moment is the need to help the thousands of people in emergency shelters, those who’ve lost their homes, possessions, and loved ones.

I am a Texan, born and raised in the Rio Grande Valley. I spent almost 10 years in Houston before moving to the mid-Atlantic in 2009. Rice University is my alma mater, and my first library job was at the University of Houston. Houston is where I learned to be a librarian, and really, an adult. I love that city so much that my family and I decided to spend our sabbatical year in town. Our place, our things, our family is fine. But others cannot say the same. So I want to spend this post sharing all the ways in which you can help Houston, Rockport, Dickinson, Corpus Christi, Port Arthur, Beaumont, and all the small Texas towns that felt the brunt of Harvey’s destruction.

NPR has an excellent round-up of local charities in both Houston and the smaller coastal Texas towns, but I prefer the list from Texas Monthly, which also includes phone numbers for organizations in case you want to call to volunteer or donate items instead of money. The University of Houston Libraries have created a Harvey aftermath resource guide which includes a list of charitable organizations. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and County Judge Ed Emmet established the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund. Local businesses and designers are also contributing portions or all profits to Harvey relief efforts, like Sew Bonita or the Stand Bayou project.

I understand we are not all in a position to give financially, nor are we all in close enough proximity to lend a pair of hands or a hammer, so I would just ask for your emotional support for folks suffering in Harvey’s wake. Chances are you wouldn’t read that national article bad-mouthing Houston to a group of evacuees sheltering at the George R. Brown Convention Center, so don’t post it on Facebook or Twitter.

Show love for Houston. Show love for Texas.