August Thoughts on the National Diversity in Libraries Conference

As the school year is about to begin, it seems like August is the month to scramble. At least, that’s how it feels for me. It’s been a month of deadlines, projects, vacation, but also conferences.

I had the opportunity to attend the National Diversity in Libraries Conference (NDLC) at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Libraries and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The purpose of NDLC is to “highlight issues related to diversity and inclusion that affect staff, users, and institutions in the library, archive, and museum (LAM) fields.”

I was fortunate enough to not only participate as a panelist, but also as a poster presenter.  While it was my intention to write about the panel I presented with, I kept thinking of the whole conference itself. I have decided to divert just a little bit. Please bear with me, my thoughts might be a little scrambled.

I want to write about how great, insightful, and inspiring the National Diversity in Libraries Conference (NDLC) was. My favorite library conference so far, NDLC brought together a diverse, intelligent, and amazing group of librarians. The participants were met with warm welcome by not only the librarians and organizers of NDLC, but the UCLA staff that kept the campus running and beautiful.

The opening keynote was given by Lakota Harden, who is an organizer, poet, and activist. As I listened to Ms. Harden’s keynote, I was blown away at the honesty and the passion that Ms. Harden gave. The keynote by Ms. Harden set the stage and mood for the rest of the conference.

“If you walk out of this, know this: You have power.”

The night before, I sat down with the NDLC program and wrote out my schedule. Looking through all the sessions and panels, I saw a variety of topics, issues, and librarian presenters and participants from everywhere in the country.

Like many other librarians there, I chose sessions/panels according to my duties and research interests. One of my (many) memorable sessions was the very first one I attended after the opening keynote. “Discovering and Accommodating the Needs of Target Communities in Academic Libraries” was a session that was composed of lightning talks from librarians throughout California and the rest of the United States (and one librarian from Canada!).

When I attend conferences and pick my sessions, I want to be informed and learn about how other librarians are serving their students. That was the thing, “students.” I am ashamed to admit that I have (i am working on it) tunnel vision. I was so focused on what the students need, what they want, and what we can provide them with, that I completely missed others. I had missed faculty, community users, and staff.

One of the lighting talks that really exemplified serving the needs of all people at their institution were the librarians at Loyola Marymount, Raymundo Andrade and Jamie Hazlitt. Andrade and Hazlitt designed some workshops for underserved staff members at Loyola Marymount. These workshops, taught in both English and in Spanish, were library orientation sessions that were held according to the Facilities staff schedules.

Like any other workshop, it had its challenges, but also brought success and allowed the librarians to form relationships with other groups on campus. This presentation made me think of the power and impact of libraries. Not only for students, but other communities within the university. These workshops not only provide a gateway to information literacy, but they provide a deeper connection to the institution. After all, a university is not just composed of students and faculty, but staff who cook, clean the buildings and dorms, and work on the landscape to keep the university beautiful and welcoming.

There were so many great sessions and panels, but the work that the librarians at Loyola Marymount are doing stuck with me for the rest of the conference.

This is what libraries can do. This is what we should be doing.

I reflected on my own work and what I can do to further engage other communities on campus. I am still brainstorming, but more to come this semester. The rest of my time at NDLC was filled with sessions and panels about archives, community outreach, and many other topics. Of course, no library conference is complete without networking and getting to know your fellow librarians. NDLC truly felt like home to me. It provided a space where I was able to marvel at all the other librarians who are doing work that inspire me. Of course, this conference was made possible by a couple of people who I think deserve a huge thank you:

-To UCLA, UCLA Libraries, and ARL for hosting this great conference and giving us all a warm welcome.

-To the people with the blue t-shirts standing around campus, giving directions to the attendees, thank you. Without you, I would have literally walked around in circles.

-To the librarians who presented, I hope you continue to do the work you are doing. It’s important and should not be put aside.

Finally, to the librarians who I presented a panel with. I was so glad to finally meet you in person and I am glad that NDLC was the place for it.

One thought on “August Thoughts on the National Diversity in Libraries Conference”

  1. Quetzalli,

    Thank you SO MUCH for the encouraging words that you shared about the work we’re doing at LMU. Your words – (and, agreed, the entirety of the NDLC conference) – is fuel to keep us moving forward with our work!

    Again, Thanks for the kind and encouraging words 🙂 .

    Ánimo,

    -ray

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *