The Ed.D. Still Makes Sense For Us

This week’s Chronicle of Higher Education features a story about Arthur Levine, President wordpress???????! of the Columbia University Teacher’s College, and a somewhat controversial report he wrote back in March 2005. The report focuses on the education of school leaders. Levine’s suggestion to eliminate the Ed.D. degree caused a particularly strong reaction from education schools. cheap MLB jerseys Many academic librarians, certainly those in administration, are themselves holders of the Ed.D. While I think Levine’s argument for some sort of M.B.A. in education curriculum for those who want to be K-12 administrators makes sense, I would argue that the Ed.D. should continue on as a valuable degree for wholesale mlb jerseys higher education administrators. For one thing, most Ed.D. programs will have a track in higher education administration that offer a good mix of theoretical (e.g., governance, history) and practical (strategic planning, statistics, law) cheap jerseys courses that will enable a library administrator to have a far better understanding of higher education institutions. But is writing a dissertation of much value? How does that help an academic librarian? The other good thing about the Ed.D cheap mlb jerseys (and perhaps as opposed to the Ph.D.) is that the dissertation project can focus on a practical administrative topic. The research could involve quantitative or qualitative methods, or both. That alone does a better job of preparing academic librarians to conduct research and write it up. I think anyone who perseveres through the dissertation process will be far more confident when tackling research for publication and presentation. While I doubt Levine’s report will bring an end to the Ed.D, for K-12 or academic administrators, I hope those who read the report or the Chronicle article Of will remember that the Ed.D isn’t just Eveniment for K-12 principals. It’s a degree with merit for academic librarians who want to pursue administrative opportunties – or who just wish to be better students Boilers of higher education.

Statements On Future Of Libraries

Kept-Up Academic Librarian featured a post today about an article from the summer 2005 issue of Tennessee Libraries that offers interviews with 25 librarians on the future of libraries. The interviewees mostly discuss academic libraries. I found myself agreeing with as many as I disagreed with. I tend to see the importance of user education and the integration of ourselves and our resources into the teaching and learning process. That theme is mentioned, but perhaps not as strongly as I would have put it. I was at least pleased to see that John Shank, co-founder of the Blended Librarians Online Learning Community was interviewed.